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Cinema 6 OGL

An Introduction to the Cinema6 Role Playing Game FrameworkEdit

The Cinema6 Role Playing Game Framework (c6) is a method for Role Players in which they immerse themselves in the action and adventure captured in movies and television as seamlessly as possible. We (Wicked North Games) have provided additional information to expound upon any existing genre of movie or television show to present a deep immersive play environment, as well as an extensive Role Playing Game Framework full of action and adventure. Like any great Role Playing Game worth its salt, this game’s design surrounds a specific set of guiding principles.

The c6 is driven by action and adventure, but also driven by the dramatic scenes and stories intertwined into a story worth telling. Behind each story is a massive universe of intertwining intrigue packed together with action, adventure, comedy, drama, fantasy, horror, mystery, and science fiction all with a flare of the cinema. These are the principles by which we designed this gaming framework.

We are fans of many movies and television shows and the fictional universes that they unravel. We are fans of Role Playing Games. Collectively we have over 50 years of Role Playing Game experience from which to draw, as well as an extensive diversity within that experience. We play many current and played almost every table top Role Playing Game ever published throughout our time as Role Players. We have experimented and tried new game mechanics. We created our own games as hobby gamers and now as fans, we create the Cinema6 Role Playing Game Framework for all to enjoy.

This design of this RPG Framework encapsulates an idea of action and adventure in the movies, specifically the danger and mortality involved with all the drama, thriller, horror, and science fiction movies. Cinema6 uniquely provides a perfect avenue for exploring the dangers of each genre and all that movie action and adventure. We hope you enjoy this as much as we do.

What is a Role Playing Game Framework? (& why do I care?)Edit

A Role Playing Game (RPG) is a game where a bunch of people (they don’t have to be friends, but it is preferable) sit around, talk, eat, and act out Characters through ad lib and impromptu acting based upon a set of information on some pieces of paper. What sets RPGs apart from acting is that it is not for the entertainment of a general audience, but for the entertainment of a handful of people who feel comfortable enough with one another to pretend and escape the normal day-to-day activities of their lives through their mutual imaginations. There are many different types of RPGs with a long history, but the Cinema6 RPG Framework (c6) is a Table Top RPG. We use the terminology Framework to indicate that Cinema6 is-and-was intended to extend and expand not only by us, its creators, but also by you the players and fans of Role Playing Games. This was our intent in creating this gaming framework and we will hold to this principal throughout its lifetime.

Table Top RPGs involve dice, paper, erasers, pencils and pens, people, and imaginations, and often a table. It also often involves an assortment of food and tasty beverages. Moreover, a Role Playing Game is a type of game without any clear winners or losers, a game where people get together to tell a story and to have a bit of fun while experiencing another universe; in the case of c6 we aim to capture the action and amazement behind the stories of movies and television.

So why do you care? If you are a fan of any particular television shows or going to the theater or Role Playing Games in general, it may be worth while taking the time to read through c6. Designed with the action and adventure of movies in mind, this RPG Framework specifically caters to the diversity presented by the imagination of Hollywood and all their successful storytellers whose ideas bring us entertainment that is both inspiring and engrossing.

The Universe behind the CameraEdit

As we unravel each story, it is important to understand the components of how to tell a cinematic story. Each story breaks apart into a premise and scenes, and each scene has two major components, a setting and scenario. A setting is a place and time of a scene. A scenario is a series of events that occur during a scene. For describing a scene in c6, a setting is still a place and time, however a scenario is an ever changing thing, where a Game Master, (GM), reacts to the Players and how they shape each story together. A GM will likely set up each scenario with triggers and events, so that when the characters interact in a certain way with the overall scene, events occur.

The c6 core rules provides a unique method for handling and distributing role playing of a dramatic character intermingled with action and climactic events. Each GM ultimately creates the universe in which each Cinema6 RPG occurs; this includes the story told which shape each episode, scene, or game session. A story genre can involve science fiction or space, horror, adventure, fantasy, film-noir and crime, western, war, thriller, historical, or romance. Everyone has a favorite film or television genre, and it is through these many forms of storytelling that we find inspiration and ways to expand our imaginations.

As c6 grows and evolves, its purpose will never change: To simplify the experience of role playing within the action and adventure of a movie while maintaining flow and storytelling as much as possible. To that end, the Cinema6 RPG Framework encourages Players and GMs alike to develop their own off shoots that take advantage of genres, and to expand upon them in ways no one has ever seen. There are so many combinations of genres we have yet to experience, but many have worked well and bring with them a great deal of excitement and fun. Whether we choose to adopt an existing story or universe, or we choose to create our own, c6 provides the means to accomplish whatever story a GM desires to tell.

A Note on LayoutEdit

The layout of this book is subject to change, however it currently exists in a chapter by chapter format, where pertinent tables either exist within and amongst the text for more immediate examples, or at the end of each chapter for longer lists, such as Skills, Special Abilities, and Weapons and Armor.

As well, the end of the book includes Tables, which include every Table in the book in a centralized location for fast and easy referencing, typically for use during game play by the GM. Where rules or descriptions seem too vague or overly complicated, please contact us directly through our forum and provide feedback:www.Cinema6Games.com/forum. We will make an effort to better explain issues or resolve misunderstandings as well to better disseminate changes on the rules. The Cinema6 Role Playing Game Framework (c6) is a labor of love for us with Wicked North Games, and we truly hope you enjoy it as much as we.

Game TermsEdit

AR Aggregate Range, The target number range representative of a specific Difficulty Rating

DR Difficult Rating, The named target range for the sum required of a specific roll of dice

c6 Cinema6 Rolling Framework

d6 A Six-Sided (6) Die

Episode See Session

GM Game Master, A Person who orchestrates and referees, as well as tells the story for a giving group of gamers

HP Hit Point, Points used to represent a Character’s Health, Fitness, and Well Being

Extras A Character role played by the Game Master

PC Player Character, A Character role played by a Player other than the Game Master

Scene A time in a game that takes place in a single location

RPG Role Playing Game

The Cinema6 RPG Framework (c6)Edit

The Cinema6 RPG Framework uses only standard, six-sided dice, (we refer to them as d6).

The Framework draws inspiration from multiple dice rolling systems to bring together balanced game play, the fast-paced action of cinema, an ease of use and simplicity for new gamers, and the inherited strengths of many existing dice rolling systems to please veteran Role Players.

The c6 dice rolling works like this: You want your Character to attempt something slightly difficult; the GM provides you with the required Skill to roll; you roll some d6, add up the values and provide the sum to the GM. The sum of the rolled dice then weighs against a level of difficulty or Difficulty Rating, (DR). Each DR has a range of numbers associated with it called the Aggregate Range (AR). The AR provides the target sums needed for a roll to succeed in the desired action for the Character.

The DRs and Aggregate Ranges are in the table below, Cinema6 System Difficulty Ranges.

It is unusual to roll against a DR Effortless, as typically a GM should allow DR Effortless actions to occur since these actions should not have a chance of failing by literal definition. In specific cases, if a Special Ability has a DR Effortless, the action should still be rolled as it is possible to counter some Special Abilities or the GM should increase their base DR.


Cinema6 System Difficulty RangesEdit

DR

Aggregate Range

Effortless

1-5

Easy

6-12

Moderate

13-20

Hard

21-30

Complex

31-45

Epic

46+

The Wild DieEdit

An Optional Feature to c6 is the concept of the Wild Die. Using a Wild Die provides potential Cinema Point spending reduction during game play by creating an avenue for re-rolling. Using a Wild Die in c6 significantly changes the dice mechanic and game play experience, but it is definitely optional. Choosing not to employ the Wild Die should weigh towards rewarding more Cinema Points during Game Play.

If using a Wild Die, every time a roll of d6 occurs, select a d6 different from the others rolled, differentiating it by size, design, and or color. This d6 is your Wild Die. The concept of a Wild Die derives from the basic principles of a Wild Card in a card game. The Wild Die provides several special functions in c6, but for normal game play, it follows this pattern:

  • For each roll, a Wild Die resulting in a six (6) the first time can roll again, as well as any subsequent time a six (6) occurs. Each subsequent result added to the total sum of a roll.
  • For each roll, a Wild Die that results in a one (1) the first time, indicates a failed roll, and must roll again. The second roll determines the degree of the failure. If the second roll results in a one to five (1-5), the failure is marginal, if the roll results in a six (6), the failure is significant. The GM determines the resulting degree of failure in context with the action.

Cinema PointsEdit

As a Player plays through games, Cinema Points earned represent a form of experience, perseverance, and personal growth. Cinema Points are the most important aspect of a Character’s development and survival. Players spend the Cinema Points during Game Sessions, as well as to improve every aspect of a Character between Episodes. Cinema Points provide the raw material for improving a Character as well as the foundation to operate the Framework.

Spending Cinema PointsEdit

If a Player chooses to spend a Cinema Point during an Episode, they lose one (1) Cinema Point and one of two things can happen, you get to roll at least one (1) d6 and add the result to the current roll or activate a Special Ability. The bonus applied by a Special Ability typically involves rolling two (2) or more d6 instead of just one (1) die. In some cases, activating a Special Ability provides a magical effect or a body weapon, and these have specific rules and guidelines associated with them. See the Special Abilities Chapter for more information.

If a Player chooses to spend Cinema Points between Episodes, it is for Character improvement. Character improvement involves increasing Skills & Abilities, buying new Special Abilities, and modifying other stats. See the Characters Chapter for more information.

Earning Cinema PointsEdit

Every time a Character kills an Extra, a GM rewards Cinema Points based upon the Cinema Point Value of the Extra slain. The Cinema Point Value of an Extra is related directly to the difficulty of defeating that Character in combat, which is subjectively assigned by the GM. A GM rewards these kinds of Cinema Points to all Player Characters in the party, so these points add up quickly. Players tend to spend Cinema Points quickly in c6, so it is important to keep track of them. While Veteran Role Players will often hold on to Cinema Points, novice Players will need to learn pause before spending.

At the end of every Game Session, also called an Episode, a GM rewards Cinema Points to all Players for their progress in the story, staying in Character, teamwork, and generally for surviving. Typically, the Cinema Point reward for an Episode is 3-8 Cinema Points per Player, normally the number is a blanket amount unless a single Player did something extra.

During an Episode, a GM may reward a Cinema Point to a single Player for a successful and dramatic Roll or for just thinking outside the box. A GM may reward a Cinema Point to a single Player for Role Playing extremely well during the Episode. A GM may also create special rewards for completing a group of Episodes, as a Season, or for completing a major story premise.

During an Episode, Players may earn Cinema Points by using a Special Ability called Martyr (see the Special Abilities Chapter for details on Martyr).

Genre VersatilityEdit

One important concept in c6 is how versatile and simply the game play works. While the concept of c6 involves three different genre-based Character sheets, Fantasy and Medieval Age, Modern and Historical Age, and Future or Science Fiction Age; the Characters created are interchangeable between genres, making cross genre storylines, such as those involving time travel, a distinctly simple possibility.

A Game Play Example

Paige is playing a Human Thief named Helen working on stealing an Egyptian artifact in some museum, Tyler is playing a Human Security Guard named Fred working on security in that same museum, both Characters created for the Modern and Historical Age. As Paige’s Character, Helen, makes her way towards the Egyptian exhibit in the Museum, Kyle (the GM) asks Tyler to roll Search. Tyler determines he has 3d in Intellect and no dice in Search, so he rolls three (3) d6, and gets a resulting sum of ten (10), a DR Easy. Kyle nods and tells Tyler that he notices an emergency exit light lit up on the security console, Tyler informs Kyle that his Character Fred, is getting up to go and investigate.

Meanwhile, Kyle determines that Helen has made her way into the Egyptian exhibit of the museum, skillfully avoiding detection with her Sneak skill (which Paige rolled earlier and got a resulting sum of twenty three (23), a DR Hard). Paige decides that Helen is going to go directly for the Egyptian artifact she was hired to steal, Kyle asks Paige to roll Search. Paige rolls her 4d for Search, and gets a resulting sum of eighteen (18), a DR Moderate. Kyle informs Paige based on this result that Helen notices some specialized security systems in place that she will need to bypass in order to avoid triggering alarms. Paige asks if she can make a Security roll to attempt to bypass the security measures, Kyle notes that the DR is Moderate for the roll to be successful, so Paige rolls. Paige only has 2d in Helen’s Security Skill, but rolls anyway to make the attempt, the result of the roll is only a sum of nine (9), making her attempt to bypass security failed, however she did not botch on the Wild Die, so she does not trigger any alarms in the process.

Kyle turns to Tyler and tells him that Fred arrives at the Emergency Exit, which is indeed pried and left slightly open, as whoever opened the door did damage to it. Tyler decides that Fred is going to look around further and then call it in, Kyle asks Tyler to roll Search again. Tyler rolls his 3d for Search and gets a resulting sum of twenty-three (23), a DR Hard, having rolled a six (6) on the Wild Die during the initial roll, and getting to re-roll it. Kyle lets Tyler know his Character, Fred, notices a scuff pattern on the marble floor of the museum; moving in from outside and proceeding the hallway towards exhibits. Tyler indicates he wants his Character, Fred, to follow the scuffmark, pull out his firearm as quietly as possible, and cock it.

Kyle smartly transitions back to the Character, Helen, who has now approached the Egyptian artifact, ignoring the security measures currently in place. Paige indicates she wants to take the artifact as quickly as possible, prepared to dive out of the way of any security doors or otherwise. Kyle tells Paige she must make two rolls, one for Acrobat, and one for Jump, noting that the artifact is not easy to lift off the base on which it sits, and that Helen will need to Jump to avoid the subsequent security cage that drops from the ceiling. Paige rolls 4d for Acrobat, getting a resulting sum of sixteen (16), a DR Moderate, and 2d for Jump, getting a resulting sum of five (5), a DR Effortless. As Paige knows Helen will be trapped by the security cage and wants to avoid it, Paige indicates she is going to spend a Cinema Point to Kyle. Kyle asks her if her Character, Helen, has any Special Abilities that will help her here; she does not, so Paige rolls a single die. The die comes up as a six (6), and Kyle tells her to roll again since the Cinema Point used is also a Wild Die and she should roll again when it comes up as a six (6). She rolls again and gets a five (5), now her total sum Jump is sixteen (16), a DR Moderate, which Kyle indicates is successful. Helen grabs the artifact, an alarm sounds, a cage drops from the ceiling, she dives for the floor nearby while protecting the artifact with her body.

Fred rounds the corner to the Egyptian exhibit to find Helen lying on the floor holding an artifact, an alarm blaring, and his hands are shaking with the gun he aims at Helen. Tyler and Paige role play, negotiating Helen’s surrender and handover of the artifact to Fred, suddenly Paige decides that Helen will throw the artifact into Fred’s arms. Kyle asks Tyler if he wants Fred to catch it, and Tyler wants to try so he rolls Acrobat, and gets a resulting sum of thirteen (13) to jump forward and catch the artifact. As Tyler rolled a one (1) on the Wild Die during his roll, Kyle indicates that Fred jumps and drops his gun in the process, but successfully catches the artifact. Kyle indicates that Fred finds himself now Grappling with Helen for the artifact, and that both players need to make Grapple rolls. Paige rolls 3d and gets a resulting sum of fifteen (15). Tyler rolls 4d and gets a resulting sum fifteen (15). The two Characters are in a standoff as the rolls are the same. Kyle then announces a surprising event, the two Characters are thrown backwards away from the artifact while wrestling over it.

Kyle tells them they have both fallen unconscious. Helen awakens first and sits up, rubbing the back of her head, looks around and discovers she is in the middle of a forest. Paige indicates she wants Helen to look around more, and Kyle tells her that Helen sees more forest and then notices Fred’s feet sticking out from some bushes. Fred awakens and clampers out of the bush immediately seeing Helen. Tyler and Paige role play the scene and Kyle describes it: the Characters, Fred and Helen, are in a forest, it is early afternoon looking, and the trees have a high, thick canopy so they have a difficult time seeing the skyline. There is a light smoke smell to the air, like a campfire, and little chirps small exotic looking birds. They mutually decide to distrust one another and travel together upwind, seeking the source of the smoke. They come to a clearing, realizing they are standing high up on the edge of a forested plateau. The scenery laid out before them by Kyle indicates they are no longer on Earth, as there are three moons in view in various states of waning and waxing, and the sunlight behind them overshadows a massive battlefield below the plateau where figures yell and attack one another. Both stunned, Paige and Tyler decide to have their Characters, Fred and Helen, sit down on some rocks and watch until the fighting stops. The battle below wages on into the night, their Characters fall asleep in the darkness.

Character Sheet OverviewEdit

Each Character Sheet for c6 represents a composite of various areas. The top area of each sheet helps define each Character, including a Name, Type, and basic Description. The central area of each sheet includes the Attributes and Skills, which define the core limits of each Character. As well in the central area are functional things, such as Derived Stats, Special Abilities, and an area for Equipment. Special Abilities are augmentations to the Character, representing unique and diverse Characteristics. The Derived Stats represent the essence of survival inherent in each Character. Equipment is a list of stuff that is important and generally is kept on person for each Character, as well as money. The bottom area of the sheet includes Weapons, integral for staying alive and surviving the action.

Each filled dot (A) on the Character sheet represents a single die to roll (1d). If a dot is open, (a), then it represents the potential for growth. A maximum yield of 12d, (Attribute with 6d + Skill with 6d), exists for c6, representing the physiological pinnacles in talent and natural ability. Dots already filled (A) represent a baseline 1d for a particular area for a Character. Each Attribute and Initiative has a minimum required 1d already filled on each Character Sheet.

Character CreationEdit

There are two basic methods to create a Character in the Cinema6 RPG.

As the first part of every Character Creation process, a Player will choose a Species. Each Species determines access to Racial Traits, which are Special Abilities only available to a certain species. In specific cases, a selected Species provides multipliers for starting money with which to purchase initial equipment or save to use for later. For this basic c6 core, the only available Species is Human (Terran). Many expansions will detail extraordinary and exciting new Species for game play in c6.

There are two primary methods for creating new Characters:

  1. Template Method: The first basic method of Character Creation is selecting a Character Template, which already has the Attributes and Equipment determined. Choosing the 7d in Skills (each circle is 1d) is the basic, first decision involved in customizing a Character Template. The 7d in Skills may “trade down” for Cinema Points; however Cinema Points may not “trade up” for additional dice in Skills. Cinema Points are only for purchasing Special Abilities during Character Creation. Each Character Template presents a foundational background with which each Player can customize a unique storyline.
  2. Custom Method: The second basic method of Character Creation is Character customization where a Player selects a Character Type, assigns 10d in Attributes and 7d in Skills (each circle is 1d). The 7d in Skills may “trade down” for Cinema Points; however Cinema Points may not “trade up” for additional dice in Skills. Cinema Points are only for purchasing Special Abilities during Character Creation. Then determine Equipment based upon Character Type. Each custom Character will need additional information added to determine a unique storyline.

The next step in Character Creation is deciding on spending or saving the five Cinema Points on Special Abilities as appropriate to the genre, (including Racial Traits, Cybernetics, Magical Abilities, Mutations, and combat and general Special Abilities), or by boosting existing Skills or Derived Stats. The last major component to Character Creation is calculating the Derived Stats.

Derived Stats are Hit Points, Move, and Initiative, each of which are determined by doing a small calculation based upon some Attributes.

Derived StatsEdit

Hit Points represent a Character’s Health and general well being, both mental and physical. Initiative represents how quickly a Character reacts and gains the advantage in Combat. Move represents how far a Character can Move during a Combat Sequence without making rolls.

  • Hit Points = Strength Dice x 12 (i.e. 36 Hit Points = Strength 3d x 12)
  • Initiative (Dice) = Dexterity Dice (i.e. Initiative 3d = Dexterity 3d)
  • Move = Strength Dice + 3 (i.e. 6 Move = Strength 3d + 3)

After Character Creation, the dependency of Derived Stats on parent Attributes goes away, so changing Hit Points, Move, Initiative, or when raising Strength and Dexterity, all should remain unaffected by these changes per those Cinema Point costs indicated in the Character Improvement Table.

Wrapping Up Character CreationEdit

One of the greatest difficulties in Character Creation is deciding upon a Character background. This information will make the game more fun, the GM’s job easier, and bring much more life to a Character. In understanding and defining a Character, a Player should consider asking this brief set of core questions:

What is the Character’s personality and motivations?

Where does the Character originate or identify as home?

How does the Character accomplish short and long-term goals?

What is the perception of the Character about this Universe?

Another option is randomly generating a Character’s background. This is often a fun process and can lead to interesting and versatile role playing for Players. We use a basic table to provide some generic, random Character Backgrounds.

Begin Rolling Character Backgrounds with three (3) d6, add the results as needed.


Character BackgroundsEdit

Roll total

Background

3

Borne into a life of extreme poverty, you struggled early on with finding basic needs, you got good at finding and keeping them later, Starting money multiply by three (x3).

4

Poor and in need of training, you sought work as an apprentice, learning the necessary tools to exceed your peers, +3 Starting Cinema Points.

5

Raised in a modest household, you dreamt of adventure and trained yourself into shape, +3 Starting Maximum Move.

6

Adopted by a wealthy tycoon, you received superior academic instruction throughout your childhood, +2d Starting Academics.

7

You survived your family and terrible tragedy, only to persevere into a stronger person, +12 Starting Maximum Hit Points.

8

Criminals carved out your childhood; you learned many useful skills to survive in a harsh social atmosphere, +1d Starting Pickpocket.

9

Your childhood Rival forced you to fight whenever possible, so you learned to avoid getting hit, +1d Starting Dodge.

10

Your early life was fairly uneventful, though you did manage to save a little money, Starting money multiply by two (x2).

11

You enjoyed the comfort of a stable family and healthy upbringing; you learned how to get your way, +1d Starting Persuasion.

12

A mediocre home life, you rarely saw your hard working parents, raised primarily by siblings, you learned the art of avoiding people all together, +1d Starting Sneak.

13

Condemned and abused, you lived on the streets as a child, and you learned how to persist despite the odds, +1d Starting Streetwise.

14

Raised by your single parent, learning the ways of survival in the wilderness, you discovered how to better live off the land, +2d Starting Survival.

15

Life in a monastery taught you the hardest lessons you ever learned, but you became better for it, +1d Starting Brawl, +1d Starting Grapple, +1d Starting Dodge

16

You were instructed by a secret group, given the tools needed to survive the worst situations imaginable, +5 Starting Cinema Points.

17

A rigorous childhood of military training and focused academics made you into force to be reckoned, +4d Starting Skills.

18

Your master gave you everything available, a good childhood, adequate money, and a superior educational and martial training regimen, the rest is up to you; +2d Starting Attributes, +2d Starting Skills, and Starting money multiply by two (x2).

Many Role Players consider naming a Character challenging. A simple rule in naming a Character is finding something that you like, something that rolls off the tongue easily, or something that best fits the personality of the Character you intend on portraying.

The Cinema6 RPG design surrounds the concept of cinematic action and simplified rules that do not bog down a story line. To spend Cinema Points to improve a stat, the Player determines the current dice value of a specific stat (i.e. 3d), and refers to the table below for how many Cinema Points is required for improvement.

Starting Characters should also begin with starting money used to purchase Props; including Equipment, Weapons, and Armor, etcetera. Typically starting Character money is 1,000 to 2,000 of the currency used for the story.


Character ImprovementEdit

Stat

Cinema Point Cost to Improve

Attributes (Dexterity, Strength, Intellect, Persona, & Aptitude)

Current Dice x 10 (i.e.: 3d x 10 = 30 Cinema Points cost to improve to 4d)

Skills, Initiative

Current Dice x 3 (i.e.: 3d x 3 = 9 Cinema Points cost to improve to 4d)

Hit Points

2 Cinema Points for +1 Maximum Hit Points

Move

5 Cinema Points for +1 Maximum Move

Creating Veteran CharactersEdit

Creating Veteran Characters is a matter of following the normal Character Creation process, and then providing Players with additional Cinema Points, which Players can spend for further developing their Characters.

The extra Cinema Points are not for purchasing Special Abilities restricted to Character Creation. This is to maintain the technical gaming balance of the Cinema6 RPG Framework during game play as well as prevention for overly powerful Characters. Character Creation Only Special Abilities are for purchase only during the initial Character Creation process.

Veteran Characters should begin with additional money for purchase of additional possessions. Typically, Veteran Characters money calculates according to the number of Cinema Points given. For Example; if fifty (50) Cinema Points are delivered to Players for Character Improvement, a multiplier of five (5) is appropriate for starting money, so where a GM decides to start Characters with 1,000 in currency, it multiples by five (x5) and becomes 5,000.

SpeciesEdit

Species covers the basic primary species found in Cinema6 RPG. As expansion material releases, more Species will officially become available to you. This should give any GM the basics on creating a Species for any custom game. Each Species area in this chapter divides into four major areas: Historical Data, Description, Racial Traits, and Connections and Relations.

Historical Data provides an overview of the home world and species as well as how they evolved to be unique. Description is both a physical and cultural description, noting unique markers that make a specific species stand out from other in a crowd. Racial Traits are similar to Special Abilities, except they are limited to a specific species at the indicated Cinema Point cost. Connections and Relations covers how each species interacts with one another, any preconceptions they may have, and whether or not they have established forms of commerce or treaties in place.

Earth, Terrans (Humans)

Historical DataEdit

Earth is an abundant world, rich in resources and Humans, and strikingly diverse, yet constantly at odds with itself. Humanity struggles to maintain peace, while balancing the unique struggle to prosperity together. Whether all Humans are willing to admit it or not, we struggle in life and for life together as a species. We have thus far persevered, but our end could come without warning and we must prepare for that time when no longer represent the dominant species of Earth. Earth will carry on without Humanity, but Humanity will not carry on so easily without the Earth.

DescriptionEdit

Modern Humans are an abundant and resourceful species. We bind together for struggles against our world and species, but struggle against one another for land, resources, and power over one another. We are diverse in our speech and languages as much as we are the same in that we struggle each day hoping that we are making the right decisions, caring for our families, and surviving another day amongst the drudgery of life. Humans vary as much in their apparel as they do in language, choosing to dress appropriately to their environments and cultures. Humans have a range of natural hair colors and many ways of coloring our hair to unnatural colors. Our eyes have far fewer colors, ranging from brown, blue and green, to gray and the rare colors of red-orange. Our skin also varies from a light tan to a dark brown, demonstrating how often our ancestors spent time in the sun instead of time indoors or under foliage away from it. There are far greater numbers of women on Earth than men, almost two to one, as the species requires the dominant gender of women to prosper.

Racial TraitsEdit

Resourceful, Cost: 5, Can take this Special Ability only on Character Creation.

Description: Humans are good at coming with a way out of difficult situations and finding creative and unique approaches that would otherwise be unavailable to them.

(+2d to a Designated Skill, May be combined with any other Special Ability)

Connections and RelationsEdit

Humans are a xenophobic species that is mistrusting to a point where they often exclude many of their own kind simply because they believe them to be of a lesser social standing. While illogically fearful of that which they cannot understand or explain, they also have an inexplicable ability to find kindness and treat others as equals despite their fears. Humans are capable of great destruction, but also capable of constructing great works of art and beauty. Humanity is complex and unpredictable as a species, and their tendency to unite in the face of death and tragedy is the path to their survival and perseverance.

While Humanity treats most other species on Earth with disdain, they also need them and have a slow epiphany awakening their kind as their relationship with their world unfolds. If Humanity discovers a new species of equal or greater intelligence, will they revere them or fear them or both?

The Five AttributesEdit

Dexterity: Dictates your initiative and the speed of your physical prowess. This includes tasks that involve hand-eye coordination, motor skills and situations that call for graceful movement.

Strength: When the going gets tough, as it often does, how long can your Character last? Strength determines not only your Hit Points, but also how much of a beating they can take. Whether you crash through a wall or square off against your arch nemesis, this is when Strength becomes vital to your longevity.

Persona: Is your Character likeable? How well is she or he received by others? If she is easily trusted (Whether it is genuine or not…) or an effective leader then the odds are the Character has a high rating in Persona. This Attribute involves a set of skills that indicate how well your Character interacts on a social level.

Intellect: Intellect measures the academic and mental capacity of your Character. How well were they schooled? Do they have a sharp wit that allows survival? This Attribute reflects how efficiently your Character’s mind processes information during critical moments of stress.

Aptitude: Aptitude is a representation for a natural knack in operating or understanding technology and performing often more mechanical or technical tasks.

Dexterity SkillsEdit

Acrobat: If you dive through the air with a grace like no other and are able to pull off death-defying acts of balance several stories above the surface then you are highly proficient in the skill of Acrobatics. Being an Acrobat will help your Character get in and escape from situations no ordinary person could conceive.

Brawl: The act of brawling covers a lot more than just punching; it involves blocking, kicking and some martial arts. When in a situation and unarmed it is time to put up your dukes and make sure you are the last one standing.

Dodge: Bullets are whizzing by you as you dive for cover. When the action gets intense this skill is critical in staying alive, making a dodge check will add to your opponent’s DR when they attempt to do you harm.

Bow or Firearms: Whether you prefer up close and personal, point-blank shots, spraying an area with a semi-automatic, wielding the punishing shotguns or shooting your opponents from a distance with a crossbow or rifle, your method of choice uses this skill. The range of your opponent and their ability to dodge your attacks determines the DR.

Hide: Sometimes concealing weapons or items on your person makes the difference between staying alive or becoming a corpse. This skill allows a Character to conceal weapons or other items from view. See Pages ** - ** for concealment ratings of weapons and other items.

Melee: When you have run out of ammo and all you have on you is a trusty bowie knife, or are creeping through the darkness only armed with a hairpin, Melee is the skill to use. Melee covers attacks and parrying, as well as a range of hand-wielded weapons, simple, improvised and complex.


Missile or Siege Weapons: Much like firearms, this skill covers the bigger weapons that deliver devastating damage. When you need to down that escaping Starship by firing that surface to air rocket launcher, firing a barrage of ballista bolts at an assailing dragon, or operating vehicle mounted weapons, the ability to fire them accurately depends on your skill rating.

Riding: Whether flying, aquatic or land-based the Riding skill dictates your control over domesticated creatures. No matter what the difficulty, sometimes the creatures will have ideas of their own. The terrain determines the DR.

Running: Sprinting, jogging and running use this skill. Not only does it indicate how fast you travel, but also how far a distance your Character can cross. Much like Riding, the terrain determines the DR. A successful Running roll doubles your movement.

Sneak: The art of stealth is essential to survival. The sneak roll allows you to make an action without detection, if successful. This skill helps overall in avoiding detection.

Pick Pocket: Stealing, agree with it or not sometimes, we have to do it. However, it has justified the Pick Pocket skill covers most actions that involve sleight of hand. The Search skill of a target determines the DR. A successful Pick Pocket roll will mean that the target will not realize right away that the item is missing.

Throw: The ability to throw an item uses this Skill. Items not intended for throwing, a desired distance or height, a moving target can all contribute and determine the DR.

Strength SkillsEdit

Climb: Used when your Character scales a vertical surface, if the Characters are not under any pressure and can take their time then allow them safety. However, if they are under any type of stress then make them roll a Skill Check depending on the circumstance.

Jump: A jump check determines the amount of distance a Character can clear. Whether you are jumping from vehicle to vehicle, rooftop to rooftop or sprinting through some hazardous terrain a skill check will often determine the difference between life, death, or serious bodily harm.

Lift: While brute strength alone is a good thing to have, the instinct that guides you through lifting an object so you will not hurt yourself is a better idea. This skill allows you to lift objects much heavier than is comfortable or normal. A successful check determines how much stress your physical body can endure while under the objects weight.

Push-Pull: The raw skill behind pushing or pulling an object to get it moving, and understanding of the basics behind momentum and torque to aid in this task. This skill allows you to push or pull a normally stationary object to some advantage, such as pushing open a door that is stuck. A successful check determines how much force you can provide to push and pull.

Grapple: Being able to bring your opponent into a submissive hold can always help prevent an undesired action. Unlike brawling, the art of grappling may come in handy when the situation calls for it.

Stamina: Your endurance is essential. A high stamina will allow you to act longer as well as resist certain poisons or diseases.

Swim: Like a climbing check, a swimming check is not necessary if the Character is not under any form of stress. However, if they are battling a raging rapid or swimming a long distance, the check determines how long the Character can survive before succumbing to fatigue. The Character then has to make a stamina check to avoid losing Hit Points.

Persona SkillsEdit

Artisan: An artistic flare or a well-trained eye can help interpret ancient works of art as well as modern ones. This also includes diagrams, instructions as well as the ability to produce art of your own. This skill also governs other artistic areas such as acting, dance and music.

Bargain: This Skill includes the art of haggling, appraising, and negotiating for the best price for a sale whether buying or selling. A favorable outcome and the DR often depend on role playing and the legality of merchandise.

Command: Inspiring a legion of troops just before battle is no easy feat; those gifted with a high Command skill seem to pull off amazing levels of inspiration. Whether it is a platoon of rag-tag militiamen, a squadron of experienced mercenaries, those with Command can often influence the tide of battle.

Con: The act of subterfuge or tricking those around you is a trait possessed by many. They say information is power, those who make a living by deceiving others to obtain it often find employment as mercenaries or often by others with their own hidden agenda. A Con check occurs when a Character wishes to conceal their own motives, lie to others or fast-talk their way out of a situation.

Disguise: Impersonating another person or blending into a group of people draws upon disguise.

Gambling: Betting a small fortune requires both using the Gambling skill and a lot of luck. Those who whisper that fortune favors the bold maybe onto something and taking risks can be rewarding or devastating. Whether professional, fun, or addiction, your Character rolls his Gambling skill against an Extra, the highest roll determines the winner; role-playing during the scenario is encouraged.

Intimidation: Sometimes in order to get your way you have to make those around you feel, uncomfortable. The Intimidation check occurs when a Player wishes to appear menacing to the point where it breaks their opponents will. Intimidation challenges your opponent’s Willpower.

Languages: Knowing more than one language can help especially on a large planet like Earth. Language barriers often hinder encounters with between people, but the well traveled often know how to recognize mannerisms and dialect. The number of dice you place in this skill determines the number of fluent languages your Character understands. Everyone starts with at least one native language.

Persuasion: When a Character wishes to charm or convince someone to see a point of view use the Persuasion Skill.

Willpower: Resisting another’s will to dominate you or pressing yourself to move on is a trait vital to survival. Under strenuous conditions, the mind and physical body are at risk of reaching a breaking point. Your Character’s Willpower is a measure of your ability to resist that breaking point. Roll a Willpower check when resisting con, persuasion, and intimidation.

Intellect SkillsEdit

Academics: A background rich in Academics will benefit any Character. Did you attend school? How far did your Character advance? Depending on a situation, the resources and time at your disposal, the dice placed in Academics may act as a bonus or lower a DR of another Skill.

Aliens or Creatures: This Skill not only measures your capability in identifying unusual or strange creatures or aliens, but also allows your Character to understand certain habits, features and any special abilities the beings may possess. The commonality of the being determines your DR.

Astrography: Getting from one place to another and knowing where you are always relies on this skill. This skill is the study of and understanding how to discern location in the known universe, whether that it is on a planet, or while in space. Characters knowledgeable in this skill are often able to identify native species and work with developed trade routes.

Business: The art of business and understanding the local economy uses this skill. Being able to decipher good Business decisions from bad using your Business savvy depends on your familiarity with the particular field. The DR is set by your Character’s knowledge and experience with the industry.

Culture: What is the difference between our cultures? Those with a high rating in Culture know what to look for. Culture indicates your Character’s awareness and study of a culture’s preference with art, etiquette, history, literature and religion. These factors may aid you in negotiating with another Culture where if the situation were sensitive, you would not want to offend your guest due to ignorance.

Law: How well does your Character know the law and how it operates? Styles of law enforcement vary from place to place. With this skill, you know what to look out for, and have a basic to complex understanding of local laws, if any exist, depending on familiarity.

Healing or Medicine: This skill governs all forms of Medicine and Healing, (at advanced science fiction levels), Cybernetic and Mutant procedures. From applying Healing magic to applying Medipaks to performing surgery, the knowledge of Medicine and using it properly can spell the difference between life and death. The severity of wounds and Stamina of a victim determines the DR to heal another Character.

Politics: Depending on your Skill Rating, Politics will allow you knowledge of local people in office, or the key figures in more regionalized Politics. The practice of Politics can influence your dealings with local authority figures that are giving you a hard time or knowing the proper people to bribe when the situation gets sticky.

Search: Perceiving clues, identifying details, spotting danger, and observing changes all tie into using the Search skill. The most obvious and widely used purpose of the Search skill is to spot another person Sneaking. The DR behind Searching includes complications such as environmental factors and the capabilities of opponents, as well as augmentations included with Special Abilities, such as magic or technology.

Streetwise: Criminals come in all shapes, sizes, and species. While the preferred methods vary, their upbringings typically start on the street. Tricks of the trade learned here come through their knowledge and networks. The more attuned the criminal the more informed they would become when the word gets out. Rumors also emerge from every corner, and the chances of you hearing it first will be determined by a high rating in this skill. After all, information is power.

Survival: Deep down in every being’s core is the essence of survival. The ability to survive the harshest of terrains and many punishing environments uses the Survival Skill. Whether it is a personal prowess or a trained specialty, an understanding of what plants are edible while will come in handy. Survival is the ability to change, adapt and live off your surroundings. Your Character’s familiarity with a place determines the DR.

Tactics: Gaining the upper edge over your opponent is a trait practiced by many, but mastered by few. In addition, those who possess a natural talent in this skill often seem godlike by those who serve under them. A Tactics check occurs against your opponents Tactics or Intellect rating and adds to an Initiative check, if the GM deems your strategy appropriate during the scenario.

Aptitude SkillsEdit

Armor Repair or Smithing: Armor is practical or ceremonial depending on its intended purpose. It also demands constant maintenance in order to perform at its peak level. Both soldiers and armor smiths know how to take proper care of their creations. Depending on the severity of the damage, an Armor Repair roll determines the quality of a repair or the time needed to make decent repairs. Time and equipment are required to perform the repair properly. If the repair is rushed, the DR rises.

Comms or Argot (Communication): The ability to use Communication Stations effectively uses a Communications check. Communication is essential during space travel, hikes into the jungle, or venturing into dangerous mountains plagued by ogres. Each Character’s intent, the environment, range, and technological capabilities determine the DR. Note it is possible to jam communication with the right equipment, which also affects DR.

Cybernetics: Crafting, improving, modification or integrating technology with the flesh has been around as long as technology itself. While some beings shutter at the idea others embrace it. Whether applying Cybernetics to a soldier who lost a limb during combat or a mercenary addicted to “improving” himself; knowing the right doctor is critical in this field. Cyborging is sometimes illegal and considered a heinous crime against Humanity. The cost of an implant determines the quality of certain Cybernetics. Insure your surgeon comes highly recommended.

Demolitions: Knowing how to place explosives and time detonations is a craft not easily mastered but highly sought after. Regardless of intent, those experts in the field of Demolitions have little trouble finding employment. The higher the rating, the more complex the explosives the Character can pull off. The time and the equipment the Character utilizes determine the DR.

Drive Repair: As a Starship moves, it draws upon a primary power source and experiences the elements of its environment. These factors tend to corrode the ship and any external damage it suffers may lead to internal damage. Luckily, there are those out there who understand how to diagnose the problem and fix it. Characters with a high skill rating in Drive Repair are often able to perform routine drive maintenance, repair damage or even build their own star drives. Drives are infinitely more complex than other systems on a ship as they often not only provide propulsion, but also provide energy for the rest of the ship, and therefore cannot be de-energized to safe conditions. The severity of the damage and complexity of the technology determines the DR. A damaged vehicle may be salvageable for parts.

Engineering: A high skill rating in Engineering will allow a Character to perform basic maintenance and repairs to major overhauls to any device or mechanism with lots of moving parts. Having a team of engineers at your disposal will help lower the DR.

First Aid: While Medicine covers the knowledge of drugs and surgery techniques, First Aid covers the intense concentration and the hand-eye coordination involved when carrying out the task of healing someone in an emergency. First Aid is available as an action during for minor injuries. More severe wounds require a Healing Station or surgery.

Navigation: The ability to get from Point A to Point B is not a feat for the timid. The art of Navigation allows a Character an adequate knowledge of the star charts and understanding of magnetic north. Depending on the skill rating, they are able to predict the distance and time, and food or fuel consumption, and have an understanding of what lies along the destined route. DR is calculated by the frequency the route is traveled.

Piloting: Those gifted with a high Piloting skill are able to control a ship or vehicle as if it were an extension of their will. Pilots can find employment easily everywhere and often love their chosen trade for the rush and the freedom of traveling. No matter the vehicle, piloting is a risky business and mistakes are often fatal. However, the payoff can be very lucrative. Piloting is the ability to drive just about anything that flies or moves on the ground with an engine. The desired maneuver, environment, familiarity with a vehicle or technology, and basic aptitude determine the DR. Those who wish to dodge enemy fire while driving a car or shooting across the stars in a ship use their Piloting skill. If a ship or vehicle has a Maneuverability rating, that value augments the Pilot’s roll.

Power Armor Ops: Whether its purpose is for industry or the military, Power Armor is available for the science fiction genre in afforded abundance. Mercenaries tend to tailor their suits of Power Armor to fit their personal “style.” While soldiers and employees of major industrial corporations use it to help with everyday tasks. Some Power Armor can be even be fitted with weaponry or can survive the vacuum of space.

Security or Sentry Evasion: The security of information, individuals and items is highly sought after everywhere. Security systems and sentries are often found in every corner and can be dangerous. Yet they apply very different techniques in eliminating potential threats. Those understanding how security systems and sentries work and are able to slip by undetected, possess unique talents. A Security or Sentry Evasion roll occurs when a Character intends to hack a computer or general security system, or avoid Sentry patrols or similar countermeasures.

Sensors: Just about every modern Starship and even some vehicles come equipped with sensors. Sensor technology allows a Character to identify, scan and track other objects in close proximity. Sensors vary in strength depending on the installed sensor package. The DR for a Sensor check is dependent on the distance, and desired detail level.

Shields: Those who can afford Shields for their vessels gain an extra edge over their opponents. Starship Shields help protect the vessel from harm. Ships and Vehicles that have shields have a shield rating on their stat sheet, that rating helps protect against damage when rolled. Simply take the Shield value and add it to the Hull Integrity when damage occurs.

Ship, Vehicle, or Nautical Gunnery: Firing guns on a ship or vehicle takes a lot of coordination and training. Those proficient in a Gunnery skill are able to fire a vessel’s weapons accurately. A ship’s weapons may contain a Fire Control rating. If it does, add that value to your Gunnery check.

Tech Repair: Technicians well trained in Tech Repair can put together just about any system to perform any function they desire. Those with a high rating in this skill can build, operate and repair just about anything with a circuit board. Simple or complex, the DR is dependent on the age, familiarity, time and tools the Character has to work with.

Weapon Repair or Smithing: All weapons break or inexplicably malfunction, sometimes during critical situations of stress. Weapons require routine maintenance and those that are properly cared for tend to last. However, when they do break your knowledge of Weapon Repair will allow you to repair the damage quickly and efficiently.

Skills Charts categorized for each major genre of Cinema 6 RPGEdit

Dexterity Skills

Fantasy & Medieval Genre

Modern & Historical Genre

Science Fiction

Acrobat

X

X

X

Archery

X

Brawl

X

X

X

Dodge

X

X

X

Firearms

X

X

Hide

X

X

X

Melee

X

X

X

Missile Weapons

Siege Weapons

X

X

Riding

X

X

X

Running

X

X

X

Sneak

X

X

X

Pickpocket

X

X

X

Throw

X

X

X

Strength Skills

Fantasy & Medieval Genre

Modern & Historical Genre

Science Fiction

Climb

X

X

X

Grapple

X

X

X

Jump

X

X

X

Lift

X

X

X

Push-Pull

X

X

X

Stamina

X

X

X

Swim

X

X

X

Persona Skills

Fantasy & Medieval Genre

Modern & Historical Genre

Science Fiction

Artisan

X

X

X

Bargain

X

X

X

Command

X

X

X

Con

X

X

X

Disguise

X

X

X

Gambling

X

X

X

Intimidation

X

X

X

Languages

X

X

X

Persuasion

X

X

X

Willpower

X

X

X

Intellect Skills

Fantasy & Medieval Genre

Modern & Historical Genre

Science Fiction

Academics

X

X

X

Aliens

Creatures

X

X

Astrography

X

X

Business

X

X

X

Culture

X

X

X

Law

X

X

X

Medicine

Healing

X

X

Politics

X

X

X

Search

X

X

X

Streetwise

X

X

X

Survival

X

X

X

Tactics

X

X

X

Aptitude Skills

Fantasy & Medieval Genre

Modern & Historical Genre

Science Fiction

Armor Repair

Armor Smithing

X

X

Comms

Argot

X

X

Cybernetics

X

Drive Repair

X

Engineering

X

X

X

First Aid

X

X

X

Navigation

X

X

X

Piloting

X

X

X

Power Armor Ops

X

X

Security

Sentry Evasion

X

X

Sensors

X

X

Shields

X

Ship Gunnery

Nautical Gunnery

Vehicle Gunnery

X

Weapon Repair

Weapon Smithing

X

X

Overview of Special AbilitiesEdit

At the core of c6 are Special Abilities, and they represent the integral form of Character customization and extensibility. Gaining Special Abilities inherently becomes akin to gaining levels in other Role Playing Games systems, providing Character depth, versatility, as well as powers and ways dramatically affecting the gaming world.

At their foundation, Special Abilities are unique ways of customizing a Character. Racial Traits are Special Abilities that are specific to a single Species. Combat Special Abilities are those that deal specifically with Combat and tend to be cross genre. Cybernetics are Special Abilities that depend on the science fiction genre, in game money and role-playing, sometimes they have other specialized prerequisites. Magic exists as Special Abilities available primarily to the fantasy genre, often requiring simpler Magic as prerequisites for complex Magic. All Magic Special Abilities utilize the Willpower Skill to function. Transgenics are Special Abilities available to the science fiction genre as intentional mutations of a subject through gene therapy and engineering.

All Special Abilities cost a single Cinema Point to activate unless specifically indicated that they are Permanent or have Permanent bonuses. The cost to buy Special Abilities for Character Improvement depends heavily on the bonuses and effects they provide to a Character. The more powerful and dramatic the bonuses provided by a Special Ability, the more it will cost in Cinema Points to purchase. Permanent Special Abilities cost more than Special Abilities that require activation every time. Special Abilities with higher d6 bonuses cost more than Special Abilities with lower d6 bonuses.

Special Abilities come in five primary forms:

  • Gain a bonus to a specific roll or Character movement.
  • Alternative Skill use for an Action
  • Lower the DR of a specific roll.
  • Activate a weapon, another Special Ability, or other Effect. This kind of Special Ability typically has complicated rules attached, such as utilizing Magic.
  • Permanent, (never spend Cinema Points to activate the Effects).


PropsEdit

Props come in many forms, whether they are Equipment, Weapons, Armor or Vehicles, all of them represent tools for Characters to use within a game. Props are by no means limited to the lists provided here, as these are basic guidelines to developing your own Props. Props tend to vary between genres, and so we have provided a limited, logical separation of the Props into the basic genre types; Fantasy, Modern, and Science Fiction.

We highly encourage GMs and Players to develop their own Props that make sense to their games, and integrate well with the genres used.

CombatEdit

Combat has specialized, but equally simple rules to encourage action-packed and cinematic combat. The dice rolling involved with Combat is in this chapter and outlines all the possible options available during combat.

As you can see, Game Play in the Cinema6 RPG is simple, but below we provide some more examples to help clear up any questions. These examples draw upon movie and video game scenes to assist in helping visualization of the Game Play.

Combat rules are a little more complicated than the basic Game Play as they depend on a specific set of circumstances. Combat is generally when at least one Character, whether controlled by the GM or a Player, wants to harm or kill at least one other Character. Combat runs under the basic premise of a Round, like boxing, however a Combat Round represents about six (6) seconds of time.

Combat normally utilizes a grid of some kind to maintain a sense of scale and apply tactics where necessary. The grid usually comprises of hexagons or squares, however the preferred method in Cinema6 RPG is a standard square grid as it provides eight (8) directions of horizontal movement, more than a hexagonal grid which only provides six (6).

A typical Combat Round:

1. The highest Initiative total wins the roll.

2. The Character(s) side whose roll won Initiative declares and has the choice to implement or hold declared actions. Held actions can occur at any point during the Round.

3. The Character(s) side whose roll lost Initiative now declares and implement their actions, as possible.

Combat involves attacking (brawling, grappling, hitting, shooting, or throwing), dodging, moving, sneaking, and taking cover.

An integral part of Combat Game Play is the understanding that rolls are primarily challenges between the GM and a Player, where the highest roll wins the challenge. A Tie between rolls goes by a simple rule.

A Tie goes to the Defender.

If a Character is Attacking and another is Dodging and the Attack and Dodge roll totals tie, the Character Dodging does so successfully, however narrowly.

There are special rules to help things run more smoothly, as well as to add a sense of danger and mortality to the Cinema6 RPG Framework. These special rules involve Initiative, Sneaking and Execution.

InitiativeEdit

Initiative is a tool for determining which Characters act more quickly in a Combat Round. Initiative can be determined using a couple of basic methods. The first method is using Group Initiative, the Player with the highest Initiative rolls for the group of lead Characters, and the GM uses the highest Initiative of the Extras opposing the lead Characters. The second method is having each individual Character roll Initiative independently, and sequence through the totals in order of each Initiative roll, highest to lowest. The first method tends to be faster, the second method tends to be more comprehensive.

Initiative LeveragingEdit

As well, c6 uses a less is better approach for Combat and Initiative. Initiative advantage leveraged against an opposing Initiative in a successive round reduces rolling. This means that if a Player or group of Players wins an Initiative, they may opt to leverage their last Initiative roll against the new round.

Example

A group of Players face Combat with a group of enemies and the GM, Fred, asks them to roll Group Initiative. Kyle rolls Initiative for his group of Player Characters, including Alicia and Terry, as Kyle has the highest Initiative among the; a 3d. Fred rolls 2d for the enemy party. Kyle’s Initiative roll totals fifteen (15) and Fred’s Initiative roll totals seven (7).

All the Characters take their actions and get to the next Combat Round. Fred asks them to roll Group Initiative again, and Kyle asks to leverage their last Initiative roll total against the new Initiative and Fred concedes. This time Kyle does not roll, but Fred does. Fred’s new Initiative roll total is a nine (9), and Kyle’s last Initiative roll automatically wins the Initiative.

This reduces rolling and speeds up the Combat Round flow a little, as well as affording the winning of Initiative a little greater benefit.

MovementEdit

Understanding Character Move is very important in terms of Combat, and especially important to better understand Sneaking. Each Character has a Move score, which is the exact number of “Moves” available in a Combat Round. I.E.: A Move of four (4) indicates the Character can Move four (4) Squares or Hexagons (given a square or hexagonal grid) in any direction in a Combat Round. Climbing and Swimming half the Character’s Move. Sneaking can be done at Full Move, however is more difficult than a half Move or less.

SneakingEdit

A successful Sneak roll is a Challenge roll between two Characters, one rolling Sneak, and the other rolling Search. If the player rolling Search does not win the roll, the Sneak is successful for that round.

When Sneaking and if attacking, if you make a successful Moderate or better attack roll; a Melee Weapon does an additional amount of Sneak Damage based upon a melee weapon’s Sneak multiplier. This multiplier is in the weapon chart for melee weapons; typically x2 or x3. A Sneak multiplier does not affect firearms due to several factors; primarily that ranged weapon damage is gauged on distance and that firearms are typically lethal at close range. A successful counter to a Sneaking opponent is a higher Search roll. A tie forces both players to re-roll. Sneaking difficulty varies by environment, lighting conditions, and any actions taken. Characters cannot successfully Sneak while firing a gun since a gun is loud and produces light, unless the gun design includes stealth.

ExecutionsEdit

While SneakingEdit

When Sneaking if not detected and attacking, roll to successful hit a target. On an Easy Roll, the attack succeeds and does normal damage, on a Moderate Roll, the attacks succeeds and does Sneak damage (as described above), and if the roll is Complex or better (31+), an Execution occurs. No Dodge roll occurs, as this is a Sneak attack. If using a Firearm to attack, a Sneak ends after the attack unless the Firearm includes special rules for Sneaking.

During normal combat and not SneakingEdit

If an attacker makes a Melee, Brawl, or Grapple roll, and exceeds the defending Dodge or Grapple roll by twelve (12+), the attack automatically causes an Execution. During any attack, a Character can counter with Dodge, Grapple, or Melee, (if already holding a Melee weapon). While Grappling over an attacker’s Weapon, the highest roll causes a Reversal and keeps the weapon. While Grappling over a Weapon, if either Grapple roll exceeds another by twelve (12+), a Reversal and Execution occurs against the loser of that roll.

ScaleEdit

Not everything in the Cinema 6 RPG Universe is the same size, so we have developed a Scaling system. If a Character or ship is trying to hit or damage something across the Scale, then dice add to a roll. See the chart below on how to add dice to a roll when suing different Scales.

Base Character Scale to Hit or DefendEdit

Character

Creature

+2d

Ground Vehicle

+3d

Star Fighter

+4d

Freighter

+5d

Cruiser

+6d

Planetary

+12d

Base Character Scale for Modifying DamageEdit

Creature

Ground Vehicle

Star Fighter

Freighter

Cruiser

Planetary

Character

+2d

+3d

+4d

+5d

+6d

+12d

== ==

Optional Combat ActionsEdit

The GM may choose to omit or modify the following rules to best suit his or her Story.

Multiple ActionsEdit

Within one turn in any round, most characters are allowed to take as many actions as their die pool allows until a critical fumble (1 on the Wild Die followed by a 6) occurs or they reach 1d. A player who intends to take Multiple Actions must declare it at the start of the round if the GM allows it. If the player's character has a 4d die pool may roll the full pool at first. Then after everyone else takes their turn the GM and the player continue with the Multiple Actions. The player subtracts 1d because of his previous action, bringing his total die pool to 3d. Then following that action continues to subtract another 1d and so on.

Example

Derek is determined to end the existence of a Goblin Captain that has been giving his character Ruk a very difficult time. With his broadsword ready, Derek declares that Ruk will take Multiple Actions and Ruk's Melee die pool is 5d. (Dexterity 3d + Melee 2d) At the end of the round, Derek subtracts a die and rolls 4d to strike at the Goblin Captain with his broadsword. The Goblin Captain also subtracts one die and rolls his Melee skill to parry. Derek beats the GM's roll so Ruk hits! Damage is calculated and it's a devastating blow that drops the Goblin Captain to the ground, dead.

If the Goblin Captain hadn't died in that attack, or successfully parried, Derek could have subtracted another die and attack again. This time he would have had a Melee skill of only 3d to use against his opponent.

Full AttackEdit

A player who chooses to initiate a Full Attack may not use Multiple Attacks or a Full Dodge during the same round and vice versa. His or her character spends that entire round preparing for the full onslaught of all their concentration, courage or might. The GM may award the player with a +1d bonus to their attack roll if the bonus is appropriate for the scene. Such as a Sniper concentrating on her target one full round before she fires or a Barbarian focusing all his energy into one swing as he calls upon the strength of his gods. That character can do nothing else that round but attack.

Example

Instead of taking Multiple Actions, Derek decides that he will use a Full Attack against his nemesis, the Goblin Captain. Since the battle has already taken several rounds and Derek's character Ruk has a short temper, the GM deems it appropriate to give Ruk a +1d bonus for initiating a Full Attack on the Goblin Captain. For this round only, Ruk's die pool is now 6d (5d + the 1d bonus) to hit. Derek realizes that he cannot take any other action except for attacking the Goblin Captain. Luckily Derek rolls high, a 21! The Goblin attempts to parry but is no match for Ruk's vicious attack.

The GM describes the scene as a volley of attacks and slashes and suddenly, with their blades crossed Ruk and the Goblin Captain are engaged in a contest of might. Finally Ruk manages to bash down the Goblin's defenses with his broadsword and lands a devastating blow.

Full DodgeEdit

When a player chooses to execute a Full Dodge, that player rolls their Dodge value plus an additional 1d bonus that round and their character spends the entire round dodging. They cannot take any other action except for the Dodge. That one roll then becomes the Difficulty Number for his or her opponents to beat. A player must declare at the beginning of a combat round that they are initiating a Full Dodge.

Example

Kathy has won the initiative and decides that her character, Lexi will be attempting a Full Dodge in order to avoid being hit by a burst of gunfire from a group of Mercenaries. Lexi has a Dexterity of 3d and a Dodge skill of 2d. Including the +1d bonus, she has a total of 6d for the Full Dodge to roll. She rolls her dice and gets a 6 on the Wild Die! She rolls the Wild Die again and gets a 2 bringing her total to 25! The Mercenaries roll their Firearms checks but none come close to a 25. Lexi dives for cover and a spray of machine gun fire strikes and ricochet's against the wall above her.

Movement Type

Movement Increase

Stamina DR

Walking

Move = Base

Effortless

Jog

Move x2

Moderate

Sprint

Move x3

Hard

Running under fire

Any Move

+1 DR

Running and firing

Any Move

+1 DR

RunningEdit

Running multiplies the character's Movement Rate. The following chart indicates the benefit of running followed by the Difficulty Rating for the character's Stamina check in order to keep running without getting winded. If the character is jogging they must make a Stamina check after two full rounds of running. If the character chooses to sprint, they must make a Stamina check at the very end of the first round. As long as they continue pass every, or every other round, they can continue moving at that rate before they run out of steam.

Example

Daryl's character Niv is sprinting across a jagged, hazardous terrain that could easily leave him crippled if makes one false step. To make matters worse for Niv, he is being pursued by a small band of Bounty Hunters actively tracking him from a small Spacecraft that is closing in fast! After dodging some small arms fire, the GM makes Daryl roll a Running check. Niv has a total Running skill of 7d (4d Dexterity + 3d Running) Niv's normal Movement Rate is 7. Daryl rolls his dice and gets a 27 that does not meet the GM's selected DR rating of Complex. Daryl spends a Cinema Point rolls a d6 and gets a five! This brings his total to 32 and Niv moves 21 squares closer to an area that will provide him with a little more cover from the Bounty Hunters. In order to continue sprinting for another round, Niv must pass a Stamina check, the GM selects the DR Daryl must meet.


Healing & Taking DamageEdit

There is always the threat of injury, pain, and the inevitability of death in any universe. These threats come in many forms and eventually your Character will take damage as a result. There are very few ways to heal an injury in the Cinema6 RPG. Healing is dependent primarily on the availability of the most advanced medical technologies and procedures of a given genre, from the magic of fantasy, to the extremely advanced medical techniques only available to the science fiction genres. Humans are still fragile creatures and die quickly from even minor injuries if untreated.

When taking damage, a Character suffers mental and physical pain and injury, represented by losing Hit Points. Whenever taking damage a player rolls to “Absorb” damage by rolling the Strength Attribute (up to 6d) and any additional protection provided by Armor or otherwise unique Special Abilities that afford protection.

Damage can occur through many methods. Damage through Combat usually occurs by a weapon. Damage occurring due to falling follows a basic rule, falling 5 meters or about 15 feet, deals 1d of damage. Each additional increment of 5 meters or 15 feet deals an additional +1d of damage. Drowning or suffocation damage occurs after a failed Stamina roll, DR determined by the amount of time under water or otherwise asphyxiated, normally 8d Damage per round, (or roughly every six (6) seconds). When a Character is unlucky enough to catch on Fire, damage occurs incrementally and increases each round, beginning at 2d Damage the first round, adding +2d each successive round until extinguished.

GMs should feel free with inventively handling Damage, especially that occurring through unique situations. Surviving dramatically through damage incurred in extreme situations is very Cinematic and worthy of developing unique and particularly specialized rules, such as Damage occurring in the vacuum of space.

Vehicles OverviewEdit

Vehicles have their own set of rules and guidelines in c6, mainly to streamline improvised Vehicles and to make things as generic as possible. Typically not a lot of time is spent in a vehicle as part of a Scene, unless in a futuristic or science fiction genre. In those cases, greater details may provide more engaging game play.

All Vehicles have some basic stats like Characters, and in many cases are living creatures, such as mounted beasts, i.e. horses. These basic stats include Length, Height/Width, Scale, Move, Structure or Hit Points, Mobility, Crew, Passengers, and in some cases some Vehicles can hold other Vehicles, such as large sea going vessels and space ships, and further details are required.

Scale is classification, which details the Scale the Vehicle exists on. For instance if a Scale of a Vehicle is Ground Vehicle and it collides with a Vehicles of Space Fighter, the Space Fighter Scale has an additional amount of Structure Points with which to survive the collision. Scale is what determines this factor.

Move is always a base provided for in Character Movement distances, thus Move is measured and weighed against the averages of people moving around. The faster you Move, the more difficult it is to Pilot a Vehicle. Below is a standard Move DR Chart which outlines the DR for going faster as well as trying things in vehicles that would otherwise be out of the ordinary. Take into account some Vehicles have a Maximum Movement Rate, where they are just not capable of going any faster.

Movement Rate

DR

Move Base

Effortless

Move x2

Easy

Move x3

Moderate

Move x4

Hard

Move x5

Complex

Move x6

Epic

Sharp turn

+1 DR

Immediate stop

+2 DR

Immediate reversal of direction

+3 DR

Structure Points, the Hit Points for Vehicles, represent the amount of physical damage the Vehicle can take before it no longer Moves.

Mobility (or Flight Control for Space Vehicles) is the bonus a Pilot receives based upon how well equipped a specific Vehicle is at making quick changes in direction and for remaining stable thereafter. Smaller Vehicles tend to have greater Mobility than larger Vehicles due to the basic mathematics and physics of mass and energy, though these are just guidelines provided based upon what we understand.

Crew is the number of operators required to make the Vehicle Move, without the number of Crew indicated the DR increases +1 DR per missing Crew member.

Passengers are the number or volume of extra non-Crew people the Vehicle is capable of comfortably and safely carrying. Any Passengers carried above the number provided increases the Piloting by +1 DR per Passenger.

Vehicles in Cinema 6Edit

Travel OverviewEdit

Every Character in a game will have a commonality, travel. Almost all the biggest, epic stories involve lots of travel. Traveling for many stories occurs to simply change scenes or augment a story to create a pivotal atmosphere for a story. The vastness of traveling across a desert might need to happen in the beginning of a story to indicate desolation or loneliness and set a feel or rhythm for a story. Travel between locations is an indicator of technology level, story flow, and an excellent method for setting the mood between scenes. Whether travel occurs quickly, or involves a long arduous journey across barren wastelands and treacherous mountains, it provides players a way to bond. GMs and players should agree on rates of travel and that the GM is not going to force players to travel unduly needed distances for no reason. Ultimately, players control the actions of their Characters and craft the story as equal partners with the GM, whose primary job it is to simply introduce elements of scenes and pivotal moments, moral dilemmas, and provide players with a challenging, thought provoking adventure making the time spent together worth reminiscing.

Characters travel primarily by walking or running. Then they investigate complex forms of travel, whether taking a steed or riding on a large star freighter, they try to shorten the travel time between locations as they become more familiar with places. The faster forms of travel are a convenience that should remain unless it is pivotal to a story that the faster travel ends. Ultimately, a GM should come up with rules governing long distance travel to make sense with the current form of technology, for instance it takes six (6) days to travel from Planet Earth using a Faster-Than-Light drive to the Betelgeuse solar system. Below we provide some basic formulas to assist GMs and Players in working together to agree on travel times.

Scale should have the greatest bearing on Movement and travel times, so that if a Vehicle is considered on a Scale of Cruiser, then the Movement units it moves are provided in Character, then while in Cruiser or Space Scale, those units are just divided by ten (/10), thus if a space vehicle has a Move 200, then a GM divides that by ten (/10) and determines that while that vehicle moves in space scaling, the distance in 20 per round. If the distance from one location to the next is twenty thousand (2,000) space units (or light years or whatever is determined), then dividing that by the resultant Move makes the math simple. Twenty thousand divided by twenty is one thousand rounds (20,000/20 per rnd = 1,000 rnds). Since a round is approximately six (6) seconds, we can determine the travel time without too much thought. With six thousand seconds (1,000 rnds x 6 seconds = 6,000 seconds) and we determine the travel time is ten hours. A GM should feel free to estimate and improvise as much as possible when considering these small formulas, as the traveling is less important than the destination when it comes to the story typically.

NPC OverviewEdit

Flora & Fauna and Extras are the two types of NPCs for Cinema 6

Flora & Fauna sectionEdit

Flora & Fauna are not game or world specific, instead this area provides resource information, including species names, given or popular names, and any specific data needed to place these specialized and unique species into the game based upon appropriate environments, climates, or atmospheres. This section is meant only to provide a basic guideline so creating your own Flora & Fauna is easier.

Extras Edit

Extras are Characters created and role played by the GM. Another term for Extras, is a Non-Player Character, (NPC). Extras typically represent non-pivotal Characters to the game story arc, where the Player’s Characters represent the leading roles. GMs are encouraged to create Extras in a similar method to Players.

TablesEdit

Table 1 - Difficulty Ratings

DR

Aggregate Range

Effortless

1-5

Easy

6-12

Moderate

13-20

Hard

21-30

Complex

31-45

Epic

46+

Table 2 - Character Improvement

Stat

Cinema Point Cost to Improve

Attributes (Dexterity, Strength, Intellect, Persona, & Aptitude)

Current Dice x 10 (i.e.: 3d x 10 = 30 Cinema Points cost to improve to 4d)

Skills, Initiative

Current Dice x 3 (i.e.: 3d x 3 = 9 Cinema Points cost to improve to 4d)

Hit Points

2 Cinema Points for +1 Maximum Hit Points

Move

5 Cinema Points for +1 Maximum Move

More Tables

CreditsEdit

© 2009-2010, Cinema6 Role Playing Game Framework, By Wicked North Games, L.L.C.

Game Framework & Design J. Elliot Streeter Brett M. Pisinski Ray Biondi

Authors J. Elliot Streeter Brett M. Pisinski

Graphic Design & Layout Brett M. Pisinski J. Elliot Streeter

Illustrators Brett M. Pisinski J. Elliot Streeter

Editing & Proofing J. Elliot Streeter Brett M. Pisinski Paige McKee A. Morrow

Game Testing J. Elliot Streeter Brett M. Pisinski Ray Biondi Nikki O’Shea Richard Bean

Technical ConsultingRay Biondi Joe “GI Journalist” Bicchieri M.A. Myslivy

See AlsoEdit